National & State Parks
Continue your child's education as you explore the natural wonder of national and state parks in Alabama.
Links and Items
Great Lodges of the National Parks: The Companion Book to the PBS Television Series
Stand amid soaring Douglas fir in the great hall of Glacier Park Lodge or sit in the setting sun and gaze into the Grand Canyon at El Tovar. This beautiful gift book will transport you to the majestic lodges of our national parks to relive the glory of past vacations or plan adventures anew. This book and the PBS television series of the same title (to air in spring 2002) take armchair travelers into these architectural wonders and explore the surrounding natural beauty of our national parks. Lodges, wildlife, and stunning vistas are showcased in 175 full-color and black-and-white photographs, along with historical documents from the PBS series. In his introduction, Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, offers a call to preserve this national heritage, and a portion of the proceeds from the sale of this book go toward the rehabilitation of these magnificent buildings.
Educational Travel on a Shoestring : Frugal Family Fun and Learning Away from Home
Educational Travel on a Shoestring shows parents how they can help their children learn–and have a blast–while traveling. From researching destinations to sharing activities that both teach and entertain, this priceless guide offers practical information for parents who want to have more fun with their kids, build closer family ties, and enjoy richer educational experiences–all without spending a fortune.
These Rare Lands
If a picture's worth 1,000 words, this book--with its hundreds of breathtaking photos of America's National Parks--is a well-stocked bookstore. Accompanied by the words of poet laureate Mark Strand, These Rare Lands is a perfect coffee-table book for anyone who has enjoyed the wonders of nature's wildest places. From a storm over Sequoia National Park in California to the otherworldly stalactites and stalagmites of New Mexico's Carlsbad Caverns and an Atlantic sunset in Maine's Acadia, this is a book that draws you back again and again. Photographer Stan Jorstad's obvious love of nature comes through in the thoughtful approach he takes to his life's work, contained in the pages of These Rare Lands.
America's Spectacular National Parks
The concept of the national park is an American contribution to world civilization, and it remains a defining characteristic of our country. From the rocky shore of Maine's Acadia to the barren crater and lush rain forest of Hawaii's Haleakala, America's national beauty is celebrated and preserved in its national parks. This book retells the history of each park, describes its most important features and wildlife, and reproduces its gorgeous scenery in full-color photographs that will enthrall armchair travelers and entice others to lace up their hiking boots and reach for their sporting gear. Organized by region of the country, it includes well-known parks like the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, and Glacier as well as lesser-known destinations like Shenandoah, Biscayne, and Kenai Fjords.
The National Parks of America
For tourists, family campers, and serious lovers of the outdoors, here is a big, beautiful, color-illustrated book that describes more than 50 national parks, sites, and seashores that stretch from Cape Hatteras on the Atlantic coast to the Grand Canyon in Arizona, Yosemite in California, Haleakala in Hawaii, and Glacier Bay in Alaska. More than 400 breathtaking photographs capture the beauty and atmosphere of each site, and 54 color maps show each park's location and major features. Visitor information panels give important details on access points, accommodations, and recreational activities such as hiking, rafting, birdwatching, and fishing. Here is a wonderful volume that will inspire plans for trips and evoke marvelous memories of past experiences in America's great outdoors.
America's National Parks: The Spectacular Forces That Shaped Our Treasured Lands
From stunning mountain ranges to arid expanses of desert, America has been blessed with an incredibly diverse land -- and the vision to protect it for our and future generations to enjoy. These lands are ours to view, wander, learn from, and revel in. America's National Parks captures all that is great about all fifty-six parks in the national park system. It also gives interesting, easy-to-understand background on the geological and ecological forces that continue to make each national park so worthy of protection.

Nature lovers will be captivated by gorgeous photos of landforms, flora, and fauna. Families will appreciate the information that is sure to enhance vacations at the parks. And visitors to any of the country's national parks will forever treasure this book as a memento of past visits and an inspiration for future ones.

Unlike any other book published on national parks, America's National Parks is a must-have for anyone who relishes America's natural wonders and wants to learn more about the powerful forces that created them.

National Parks in Alabama
Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
Horseshoe Bend National Military Park is located near Daviston. Learn about the history of the final battle of the Creek War of 1813-14, part of the War of 1812, in which Andrew Jackson and an army of 3,300 men consisting of Tennessee militia, United States regulars and both Cherokee and Lower Creek allies attacked Chief Menawa and 1,000 Upper Creek or Red Stick warriors fortified in the "horseshoe" bend of the Tallapoosa River. This 2,040-acre park preserves the site of the battle.
Little River Canyon National Preserve
Little River flows for most of its length atop Lookout Mountain in northeast Alabama. The river and canyon systems are spectacular Appalachian Plateau landscapes any season of the year. Forested uplands, waterfalls, canyon rims and bluffs, stream riffles and pools, boulders, and sandstone cliffs offer settings for a variety of recreational activities. Natural resources and cultural heritage come together to tell the story of the Preserve, a special place in the Southern Appalachians. Little River Canyon National Preserve is located near Fort Payne.
Russell Cave National Monument
For thousands of years bands of prehistoric Indians came to the area we know today as Russell Cave. The cave provided a shelter. The surrounding forest provided food, tools, and fuel for their fires. Occupation of the cave shelter continued from the earliest known people to inhabit the southeastern United States, until the time of European explorers. The story of the inhabitants of Russell Cave is one of adaptation and survival. These people left behind clues to their way of life. These clues help us to have a better understanding of the people who have gone through the mists of time. Russell Cave National Monument is located near Bridgeport.
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site
Tuskegee Institute, a small black college in Alabama, was selected to host the "military experiment" to train African American pilots and support staff--thus the Tuskegee Airmen were born. The outstanding performance of the over 15,000 men and women who shared the "Tuskegee Experience" from 1942-1946, is immortalized at the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site.
Appalachian National Scenic Trail
The Appalachian National Scenic Trail is a 2,180-mile footpath along the ridgecrests and across the major valleys of the Appalachian Mountains from Katahdin in Maine to Springer Mountain in northern Georgia. It traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains. Conceived in 1921, it was built by private citizens and completed in 1937. The trail traverses Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia.
Trail of Tears National Historic Trail
The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward. Today the trail encompasses about 2,200 miles of land and water routes, and traverses portions of nine states.
Natchez Trace Parkway
The 444-mile Natchez Trace Parkway commemorates an ancient trail that connected southern portions of the Mississippi River to salt licks in today’s central Tennessee. Over the centuries, the Choctaw, Chickasaw and other American Indians left their marks on the Trace. The Natchez Trace experienced its heaviest use from 1785 to 1820 by the “Kaintuck” boatmen that floated the Ohio and Miss. Rivers to markets in Natchez and New Orleans. They sold their cargo and boats and began the trek back north on foot to Nashville and points beyond. Today, visitors can experience this All-American Road through hiking, biking, horseback riding and camping. The Natchez Trace Parkway occupies areas in the states of Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennesee.
George Washington Carver Museum at the Tuskegee Institute Historic Site
The legacy of Booker T. Washington, George W. Carver and many others has been preserved in the Historic Campus District where original buildings built by the students, with bricks made in the Institute brickyard still stand. The historic site also features the George Washington Carver Museum.
Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
The Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail stands as a testament to the sacrifices made in the triumph to preserve the “right to vote” as the bedrock of American democracy. It commemorates the final push to achieve a nationwide solution to the disenfranchisement of African Americans with three strategically planned marches, the first of which took place in March 1965. The Trail occupies areas in Montgomery, Lowndes & Dallas Counties.
Alabama State Parks
Lake Guntersville State Park
Just six miles northeast of Guntersville, off Highway 227, overlooking the majestic 66,470-acre Guntersville Reservoir, the park ranges over 5,909 acres of ridge tops and meadows. The park's resort lodge, restaurant and convention complex is located on Little Mountain, providing a magnificent view of the reservoir. The Lake is wonderful for fishing as well as swimming and other water sports activities. Recently, it has become the winter home of our national symbol, the Bald Eagle.
Claude D. Kelley State Park
Just 12 miles north of I-65 at Atmore and beneath towering pines, the 960-acre park provides for fishing and swimming on a 25-acre lake. Campers can wander the trails or enjoy the water from daylight to dark.
Oak Mountain State Park
Just off I-65, 15 miles south of Birmingham, Oak Mountain's 9,940 acres span pine-studded ridges and lush green valleys. The park offers vacation cottages, golf, improved camping, picnicking, tennis, swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, mountain biking, backpacking, a demonstration farm, and horse boarding and riding facilities. With the largest area and variety of outdoor recreational pursuits, Oak Mountain is sure to provide excitement for every member of the family.
Chattahoochee State Park
Located 11 miles southeast of Gordon and situated in the southeast corner of the state, this 596-acre scenic attraction takes its name from the nearby Chattahoochee River. Come and enjoy a day's outing of hiking, picnicking and fishing.
Chewacla State Park
Located four miles south of Auburn and convenient to I-85, Chewacla's 696 scenic areas are a delightful haven for road-weary tourists. Features include a 26-acre lake and rental boats, picnic areas and cabins and campsites for overnighting.
Rickwood Caverns State Park
Thrill to Rickwood's miracle mile of underground caverns. The 260 million-year-old limestone formations, blind cave fish and underground pools are just a few of the natural wonders exhibited in the colorful caverns. The park also features an Olympic size swimming pool, picnic area and campground.
Florala State Park
Located in the city of Florala, along beautiful Lake Jackson, this 40-acre park offers swimming, fishing, a community building, campground and picnic area along the shore.
Gulf State Park
Ranging across 6,150 acres with 2.5 miles of sugar white sand beach, Gulf State Park has a spectacular resort/convention complex. It includes a 144-room beachfront resort hotel with an outstanding restaurant and cocktail lounge. Spend a lazy afternoon drifting in a canoe (the Park does not offer canoe rentals), by the shores of Lake Shelby, or a dip in the Hotel swimming pool. Fish off an 825 foot pier, the longest on the Gulf, or in a 500 acre freshwater lake a stone's throw away. Meander along nature trails. View exciting live exhibits. Spend your nights in a camper, a family size lakefront cabin, or a luxury hotel room facing the Gulf.
Cathedral Caverns
Cathedral Caverns was originally called Bats Cave. Jacob (Jay) Gurley bought the cave in 1955 and opened it to the public. When he took his wife into the cave for the first time, she was struck by the beautiful of one big room with all the stalagmites and stalactites and said that it looked like a "cathedral." Gurley wisely changed the name of the cave at that point and it has been known since then as Cathedral Caverns, although it has changed hands many times. Cathedral Caverns became a state park in 1987. It includes 461 acres of land near Grant, Alabama. The cave now has a paved and lighted pathway that is 10 feet above the original path. The walk is a little over a mile for the round trip and takes an hour and 15 minutes.
Chickasaw State Park
Located on US 43, four miles north of Linden in rural Marengo County, Chickasaw's 520 acres provide improved campsites, hiking trails, a barbecue grilling pavilion, plus other large pavilions, picnic areas perfect for group-size cookouts and gatherings and a wading pool.
Lake Lurleen State Park
Located 12 miles northwest of Tuscaloosa, the park is named for Alabama's only woman governor, Lurleen B. Wallace. This 1,625-acre park is a scenic lakeside retreat, set on the banks of a 250-acre lake. You may bring your boat or rent one of ours to pursue a fun-filled day at the lake.
Cheaha State Park
Located atop Cheaha Mountain, the highest point in the State, 2,407 feet above sea level, this 2,799 acre mountain top retreat exhibits breathtaking scenery year-round. Seated at your evening restaurant dining table, you can enjoy a spectacular sunset as the perfect complement to an excellent meal. Then after an exhilarating day of hiking, swimming, or photographing nature's beauty, you can retire to a comfortable hotel room, mountainside chalet, cabin or a scenic campsite.
Paul M. Grist State Park
Located 15 miles north of Selma, Alabama. Tranquility prevails in this beautiful 1,080-acre park as visitors enjoy the relaxing atmosphere surrounding the 100-acre lake. Improved camping and refreshments are available. Facilities include - Pedal Boats, Canoes, Flat Bottom Boats and Swimming, Full Hookup Camping, Primitive Camping, Hiking, Picnic Pavilions, and Restrooms with hot showers.
Desoto State Park
Desoto State Park is located eight miles northeast of Fort Payne in northeast Alabama. In the pioneer spirit of the explorer, DeSoto Park ranges over 5,067 acres along Little River. Accented by rushing waterfalls and fragrant wildflowers, the park enhances the pioneer spirit with a unique restaurant, resort and cabin facilities. Also nestled into the lush, green mountain foliage of Lookout Mountain, the park provides a modern campground, laundry and camp store as well as a picnic area, swimming pool, tennis courts, nature center and many miles of hiking trails. Along the extensive scenic drive in the park, you can photograph DeSoto Falls, Little River Falls, and many magnificent vistas along Little River Canyon; the deepest canyon east of the Mississippi River.
Joe Wheeler State Park
The main facilities are near Rogersville, Alabama and include a modern resort lodge containing 75 spacious rooms, a picturesque restaurant and full service convention facilities, all directly on the shores of Wheeler Lake on the beautiful Tennessee River. Adjacent to the lodge is a full service marina with 134 slips providing both permanent and overnight docking facilities for river travelers, and within walking distance is an 18-hole championship golf course complete with clubhouse. Additional facilities include a modern campground secluded in a shady grove along the lakeshore, and a day-use area containing picnic tables, grills, pavilions, comfort stations, play areas and a sandy beach with bathhouse.
Wind Creek State Park
Located seven miles southeast of Alexander City, this park spans 1,445 acres along the shores of Lake Martin, which is a 41,000 area clear water reservoir perfect for fishing, swimming and boating. Park facilities include the largest state operated campground in the United States with 640 sites, many of which are waterfront sites allowing campers to fish, swim and boat right out their back door. Other facilities include a marina, camp store, fishing pier, hiking trails, playground and picnic areas with tables, grills, and shelters.
Meaher State Park
Located two miles west of Spanish Fort on Highway 90. This 1,327-acre park is situated in the wetlands of Mobile Bay and is primarily a day-use park. A boat ramp and newly constructed pier are available to fisherman. Self-guided tours over two nature trails include boardwalks over the Mobile Delta.
Lakepoint Resort State Park
Located seven miles north of Eufaula off Highway 431 on the Alabama-Georgia line, Lake Eufaula is known as the "Bass Capital of the World." This picturesque 1,220-acre park complements the beautiful 45,200-acre Eufaula Impoundment with many resort facilities including a full service marina. You may also enjoy the adjoining National Wildlife Refuge.
Roland Cooper State Park
Located six miles northeast of Camden, rolling along the 22,000-acre Dannelly Reservoir, this 236-acre park features a nine hole golf course with clubhouse; spacious vacation cottages; modern campground with bathhouse, laundry and camp store; and a scenic picnic area with tables, grills, pavilions and comfort station. With fishing so popular in the reservoir, the park also provides boat launching facilities and bait & tackle amenities.
Frank Jackson State Park
This 2,050 acre park is ready to serve as your fishing spot of the South, with a well-stocked and managed 1,000 acre lake. A swimming beach, picnic area, campground and playground are also available.
Monte Sano State Park
"Monte sano" is Native American for "mountain of health." Despite the urban development that encircles it, 1,650-foot Monte Sano is said to have cooler, cleaner air than its surroundings. So refreshing was its air that the mountain at one time was the site of a sanatorium. Located in Huntsville and in existence since 1935, Monte Sano's 2,140 acres combine the history of the Civilian Conservation Corps with the space age technology of the future. Hike a trail in the morning, stroll through the Japanese Garden, visit the Space and Rocket Center and ride a space station simulator in the afternoon. It offers camping, hiking, picnicking with great views and rock climbing. Of the park's 27-mile trail system, about 20 miles of trails lower on the mountain are shared by hikers and mountain bikers. There is primitive camping at Monte Sano and 89 developed campsites. Fourteen rustic cottages near a cliff overlook the valley. Also of interest are the nearby Burritt Museum, devoted to regional history, and the Von Braun Planetarium within the park.
Buck's Pocket State Park
Located two miles north of Grove Oak and secluded in a natural pocket of the Appalachian Mountain chain, this 2,000-acre park is a naturalist's dream. Various hiking trails highlight this park. Uniquely located, the park's picnic area offers a natural vista into the pocket below. A boat launch and fishing area are also provided seven miles away at Morgan Cove on Lake Guntersville. The campground is nestled in the bottom of the canyon, several miles upstream from the lake.
Bladon Springs State Park
Located one mile north of Bladon Springs, this day use park features Sulfur Water Springs and basic facilities for daytime family outings.
Blue Springs State Park
Located six miles east of Clio and fed by a crystal clear underground spring, the park's swimming pool is the center of attraction in this 103-acre park. Other complementing facilities include picnic shelters, tables, grills, comfort stations, playground, tennis courts and modern campground.
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America's Spectacular National Parks
The concept of the national park is an American contribution to world civilization, and it remains a defining characteristic of our country. From the rocky shore of Maine's Acadia to the barren crater and lush rain forest of Hawaii's Haleakala, America's national beauty is celebrated and preserved in its national parks. This book retells the history of each park, describes its most important features and wildlife, and reproduces its gorgeous scenery in full-color photographs that will enthrall a...
The National Parks of America
For tourists, family campers, and serious lovers of the outdoors, here is a big, beautiful, color-illustrated book that describes more than 50 national parks, sites, and seashores that stretch from Cape Hatteras on the Atlantic coast to the Grand Canyon in Arizona, Yosemite in California, Haleakala in Hawaii, and Glacier Bay in Alaska. More than 400 breathtaking photographs capture the beauty and atmosphere of each site, and 54 color maps show each park's location and major features. Visitor inf...
Shurley English
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Homeschool Bravely: How to Squash Doubt, Trust God, and Teach Your Child with Confidence
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The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric
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