Native Americans
Resources
Fort Toulouse/Fort Jackson Living History Events
Wetumpka, AL
Events include monthly living history programs (the French period and the early American period), monthly meetings of the Historic Blacksmiths, French and Indian War Encampment (held annually in April and re-enacts the time period of the war between the French and the British), Alabama Frontier Days (held annually in November and depicts life on the frontier from 1717 to 1820).
Things to See & Do in Alabama
Moundville Archaeological Park
Eight hundred years ago, Moundville was the largest city in North America. Visit the site of this ancient city and tour the Jone Archaeological Museum, which houses artifacts and interpretive exhibits providing information on more than 60 years of archaeological excavations and investigations. The theater offers a series of videos on Moundville and the history of Southeastern Indians. There is also a nature trail, Indian Village and Crafts Pavilion, and more. The site and facilties are located in Tuscaloosa.
Trail of Tears National Historic Trail
The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward. Today the trail encompasses about 2,200 miles of land and water routes, and traverses portions of nine states.
American Village Citizenship Trust
The mission of The American Village Citizenship Trust is to strengthen and renew the foundations of American liberty and self-government through citizenship education. Join costumed historical interpreters as a Nation is born and a Constitution is framed. Learn how the words "We the People" have come to include all Americans. Explore the historically-inspired buildings of The American Village, including Washington Hall which is patterned after George Washington's historic Mount Vernon. Stroll the Village's Constitution Green and Southern Living Colonial Gardens. Experience Houdon's masterful statue of Washington, the Alabama Power Voting Experience, the Rising Sun Chair, the President's Oval Office, and other engaging exhibits. The American Village is located about 30 minutes south of Birmingham in Montevallo.
Isabel Anderson Comer Museum and Arts Center
Located in Sylacauga, the Museum offers special art exhibits, sculpture, the Native Sons Gallery, historical photgraphs, historical displays, and classes.
Florence Museums System
The Florence Museums System consists of five separate properties: W. C. Handy Home, Museum & Library, a restored log cabin that was the boyhood home of the famous composer known as the "Father of the Blues"; Indian Mound and Museum; Pope's Tavern Museum, a Civil War era historic site; The Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts; and Frank Lloyd Wright-Rosenbaum House.
Natchez Trace Parkway
The 444-mile Natchez Trace Parkway commemorates an ancient trail that connected southern portions of the Mississippi River to salt licks in today’s central Tennessee. Over the centuries, the Choctaw, Chickasaw and other American Indians left their marks on the Trace. The Natchez Trace experienced its heaviest use from 1785 to 1820 by the “Kaintuck” boatmen that floated the Ohio and Miss. Rivers to markets in Natchez and New Orleans. They sold their cargo and boats and began the trek back north on foot to Nashville and points beyond. Today, visitors can experience this All-American Road through hiking, biking, horseback riding and camping. The Natchez Trace Parkway occupies areas in the states of Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennesee.
Fort Toulouse / Fort Jackson
This historic park features Fort Toulouse, a re-creation of the last French fort; Fort Jackson, built on the site of the original French fort; recreated Creek Indian houses; a visitor center; Mississippian Mound; the William Bartram Nature Trail; and much more! There are monthly living history programs and an annual French and Indian War Emcampment.
Pond Spring, The General Joe Wheeler Plantation
Pond Spring was the post-Civil War home of Gen. Joseph Wheeler, a Confederate major general, a U.S. congressman, and a Spanish-American War general. The 50-acre site includes a dogtrot log house built around 1818, a circa 1830 Federal-style house, the 1870s Wheeler house, eight farm-related outbuildings, two family cemeteries, an African-American cemetery, a small Indian mound, a pond, a boxwood garden, and other garden areas. Staff members lead tours of the Wheeler House five days a week; grounds and other buildings are also open.
Guntersville Museum and Cultural Center
Opened in October, 1993, the museum features a TVA exhibit, Indian Room, and River Room which focus on topics relating to local history. Future exhibits will include a War room.
Russell Cave National Monument
For thousands of years bands of prehistoric Indians came to the area we know today as Russell Cave. The cave provided a shelter. The surrounding forest provided food, tools, and fuel for their fires. Occupation of the cave shelter continued from the earliest known people to inhabit the southeastern United States, until the time of European explorers. The story of the inhabitants of Russell Cave is one of adaptation and survival. These people left behind clues to their way of life. These clues help us to have a better understanding of the people who have gone through the mists of time. Russell Cave National Monument is located near Bridgeport.
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